Twisted — An Arizona garden in California

WPC-Twisted-IMG_0971

Cactii twist toward the Sun, Arizona Garden, Stanford University, 2018

The restored Cactus Garden at Stanford is in full bloom this year. The twisted plants thrive in the new warmer California climate. (Click on any image below to view in full screen.)

The garden is open to visitors every day of the year:

 

The ga was first planted between 1880 and 1883 for Jane and Leland Stanford to a design by landscape architect Rudolph Ulrich. It was planned to be adjacent to their new residence, and part of the larger gardens for the Stanford estate. However, the home was never built. The garden was regularly maintained until the 1920s after which it fell into great disrepair. Volunteer restoration work began in 1997 and is ongoing. Notwithstanding decades of neglect, some of the original plants remain.
Wiki: Arizona Cactus Garden, Stanford University

Cheers, Carto

Check out the twists of bloggers trying to me the Weekly Photo Challenge — Twisted.

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About carto

Retired software engineer who grew up in Montana, went to Montana State College in Bozeman, and moved to California to work at Stanford Research Institute (SRI). Carto's Library is about books I've read and liked; Carto's Logbook is about photography, travel and adventure. Mt. Maurice Times is tall tales mostly biographical.
This entry was posted in History, Nature, Photography, Weekly Photo Challenge and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Twisted — An Arizona garden in California

  1. Pingback: Twisted – Allium | What's (in) the Picture?

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